Botanical Garden of Florence

Original name

Giardino dei Semplici

Geographic Area

Poppi, Italy

Project Type

Park and Garden survey

Site description

The Botanical Garden of Florence was founded on 1 December 1545, by Cosimo I dei Medici, when he rented from the overlooking Monastery of San Domenico in Cafaggio the land on which the Garden was to be built. The "Giardino dei Semplici", so called because it was born as a garden of medicinal plants, called "Semplici", was designed by Niccolò called Il Tribolo. All the works related to the construction were directed by Luca Ghini who was also concerned with increasing the new collections of plants. In 1718, by the will of Cosimo III de' Medici, it was entrusted to the care of the Florentine Botanical Society and had Pier Antonio Micheli as its Director. During the years of his direction, the collections of plants, not only medicinal, were further enriched making it famous throughout the world. Since the post-war period, the collections of the garden have been increased with scientific expeditions carried out in Italy and abroad, paying attention to education through the creation of exhibition areas and guides on the collections. Inside you can find very ancient plants, for example the Tasso del Michei, specimens of Mediterranean flora and tropical areas and food plants.

Credits

Promoted by
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Coordinators
Sandro Parrinello,

Partnership
UNIPV, University of Pavia

Survey Activities

Surveyors
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  • Gallery

Documentation Methodology

The documentation project consists in surveying the Botanical Garden using laser scanner. Through this documentation, the various types of vegetation were defined. Through the use of the point cloud, a planimetry of the place has also been elaborated.

Bibliography

Sandro Parrinello (2013). Esperienze di documentazione e analisi per la tutela della città caraibica. In: Città e Territorio. Conoscenza, tutela e valorizzazione dei paesaggi culturali. vol. 1, p. 226-231, Debatte, ISBN: 9788862971584, Massa Marittima, Novembre 2012.

Villa Fabbricotti’s Garden

Original name

Villa Fabbricotti

Geographic Area

Florence, Tuscany, Italy

Reference Project

Park and Garden survey

Site description

The Park, fully recovered for the use of public green and connected with the adjacent Stibbert Park, still maintains the image and the grandeur of its original plant, despite the adjustment to the needs of vehicle access to the villa through the avenue that starts to the right of the large gate of the main entrance, immediately after the janitor's house and that, along the border wall, leads to the new parking lot built in the north-eastern vertex of the Park. It maintains its characterization around a longitudinal axis, constituted by the entrance square, with fountain and a neoclassical basin-rampe-villa-temple, which visually divides it into two portions. The large access avenue, on the other hand, with its sinuous course that intersects the ramps in two points, stitches together the various parts of the Park in a sequence of views and crossings that make the Park feel like a unitary and pulsating organism. After the woody masses that fill the portions delimited by the wide bends of the first stretch of the avenue, the Park near the Villa stretches out with wonderful openings on the urban and hilly landscape, exalting more than the masses of vegetation single plants such as the wonderful Cedrus deodora, placed in the side square with the belvedere, or as some beautiful palms (Washingtonia filifera) placed on the squares of the opposite side.

Credits

-

Coordinator
Sandro Parrinello

Partnership
UNIPV, University of Pavia
UNIFI, University of Florence

Survey Activities

Surveyors
Carlo Raffaelli

Post production Activities

2D Drawings
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  • Gallery

Documentation Methodology

The church's documentation actions were carried out in 2018. A TLS laser scanner survey campaign was planned with FARO Focus S150 which produced 24 scans for the description of the internal and external environments of the building's factory. In parallel, a photogrammetric acquisition of the external facings and roofs was envisaged through UAVs remotely piloted systems which produced a model of 3207706 faces, and a photogrammetric acquisition with Nikon D7200 camera of the accessible interior rooms of the church.

The integrated survey documentation was used for two representation actions, one aimed at creating two-dimensional drawings of the structure for the design of the details, and useful for reflecting on the analysis of deterioration and pathologies present on the structure; the second was aimed at creating an H-BIM model of the factory by analyzing the data of the point clouds for the construction of the model structure.

Bibliography

Parrinello, S., Picchio, F., De Marco, R., Dell'Amico, A. (2019). Documenting the cultural heritage routes. The creation of informative models of historical russian churches on upper kama region. ISPRS - International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences. XLII-2/W15. 887-894. ResearchGate